Don Alejandro leads his grandchildren in the Pachamanca
Don Alejandro leads his grandchildren in the Pachamanca

A stone tower is first created and then heated from the inside with fire. When the stones are sufficiently hot, meats and vegetables are added with the stone structure collapsed then covered.

Keeping an eye on the Pachamanca
Keeping an eye on the Pachamanca

Pachamanca comes from the Quechua words pacha and Manka, or earth pot.

Adding food to the hot stone structure
Adding food to the hot stone structure

After the food is added and the structure collapsed, it will be covered by wet burlap, straw and dirt to cook.

Verónica Crispín
Verónica Crispín

While traditionally it is the women who take on the domestic roles in high Andean families, Verónica has expressed explicit interest in following in her father’s footsteps. She has joined her father, Louis, on some of his shorter expeditions and has the ambitious goal to be the youngest person to summit the 6,384 meter peak of Ausangate.

Don Alejandro pays tribute to the Apu
Don Alejandro pays tribute to the Apu

Apu or mountain spirit comes from the Inca belief in the sacredness of the Andes. The apu were said to watch over and protect the peoples of the valley. Before making passage to the mountains, one must pay respect to the Apu by gift. Pisco, sugar, fava bean, coca leaf, vicuña fur and other essentials are blessed and then carried up the valley to be burnt in offering. Here don Alejandro blesses the coca leaves.

Clever Crispín
Clever Crispín
The cousins getting up to something
The cousins getting up to something
Delia looking contemplative
Delia looking contemplative
John upset about not recieving enough attention
John upset about not recieving enough attention
Davíd and Verónica take a break from playing soccer
Davíd and Verónica take a break from playing soccer
DSC09996.jpg
Don Alejandro
Don Alejandro

With Ausangate towering above, don Alejandro saddles his horses for travel up the valley.

DSC05846.jpg
Sequinned hat
Sequinned hat

The intricacy of these large sequinned hats are done by hand and worn at special social gatherings. One of such events involves a yearly meeting where the town comes together to shame the unfaithful individuals of the community for their infidelity.

Freddy Crispín
Freddy Crispín
John Crispín
John Crispín

You know he’s up to no good with those eyes.

DSC06143.jpg
DSC06162.jpg
Macardio Crispín
Macardio Crispín

Macardio stands in the front yard framed by the distant Vilcanota mountains.

Davíd Crispín
Davíd Crispín
Don Alejandro leads his grandchildren in the Pachamanca
Keeping an eye on the Pachamanca
Adding food to the hot stone structure
Verónica Crispín
Don Alejandro pays tribute to the Apu
Clever Crispín
The cousins getting up to something
Delia looking contemplative
John upset about not recieving enough attention
Davíd and Verónica take a break from playing soccer
DSC09996.jpg
Don Alejandro
DSC05846.jpg
Sequinned hat
Freddy Crispín
John Crispín
DSC06143.jpg
DSC06162.jpg
Macardio Crispín
Davíd Crispín
Don Alejandro leads his grandchildren in the Pachamanca

A stone tower is first created and then heated from the inside with fire. When the stones are sufficiently hot, meats and vegetables are added with the stone structure collapsed then covered.

Keeping an eye on the Pachamanca

Pachamanca comes from the Quechua words pacha and Manka, or earth pot.

Adding food to the hot stone structure

After the food is added and the structure collapsed, it will be covered by wet burlap, straw and dirt to cook.

Verónica Crispín

While traditionally it is the women who take on the domestic roles in high Andean families, Verónica has expressed explicit interest in following in her father’s footsteps. She has joined her father, Louis, on some of his shorter expeditions and has the ambitious goal to be the youngest person to summit the 6,384 meter peak of Ausangate.

Don Alejandro pays tribute to the Apu

Apu or mountain spirit comes from the Inca belief in the sacredness of the Andes. The apu were said to watch over and protect the peoples of the valley. Before making passage to the mountains, one must pay respect to the Apu by gift. Pisco, sugar, fava bean, coca leaf, vicuña fur and other essentials are blessed and then carried up the valley to be burnt in offering. Here don Alejandro blesses the coca leaves.

Clever Crispín
The cousins getting up to something
Delia looking contemplative
John upset about not recieving enough attention
Davíd and Verónica take a break from playing soccer
Don Alejandro

With Ausangate towering above, don Alejandro saddles his horses for travel up the valley.

Sequinned hat

The intricacy of these large sequinned hats are done by hand and worn at special social gatherings. One of such events involves a yearly meeting where the town comes together to shame the unfaithful individuals of the community for their infidelity.

Freddy Crispín
John Crispín

You know he’s up to no good with those eyes.

Macardio Crispín

Macardio stands in the front yard framed by the distant Vilcanota mountains.

Davíd Crispín
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